Tuesday, March 06, 2007

FAQ: I just moved over to 2.1. Where are the reminders?

At present 2.1 alpha does not have Reminders. Instead it has Ticklers. Unfortunately Ticklers are a lot more primitive than Reminders, eg with reminders you can do repeating events, monthly, day of week etc. You can see approaching reminders with a "number of days until" display. I am a big fan of Reminders. The reasons that I didn't include reminders so far are: a). Reminders are not strictly "GTD-like". b). I wanted to improve ticklers so they are more powerful and can do more of the things that Reminders can do now. c). Reminders are based on an old TiddlyWiki and could be much improved efficiency-wise by updating to use Tiddler fields. But I am reconsidering this as many 1.0 users are missing them including myself somewhat.

Also I have inherited custody of the ReminderMacros from the author Jeremy Sheely. Long term I want to create a full scheduling/calendaring app for TiddlyWiki and then incorporate that into MonkeyGTD and use it for Ticklers. But in the short term I have no clear vision.

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7 Comments:

Blogger Doug said...

It is serendipitous how the world works. I spent an hour yesterday afternoon putting the reminder macros into the GTD Wiki for my personal use.
When I had the reminders, the calendar did not display them nicely. I had to pull in the calendar from the ReminderMacros page as well.
This is going to cause problems in the future isn't it?
Simon, can you share the differences in ticklers from reminders. Is it just a name change, or will there be major feature differences?

6:03 AM PST  
Blogger simon said...

Well ticklers are just a tiddler with a date. They appear in your dashboard when on (and after) the date, or until they are marked as "Processed". Reminders are... well they are exactly like that only completely different in nearly every way....

3:23 PM PST  
Blogger Aldo said...

Simon, just to let you know you are doing a fantastic job! I was already hooked to TiddlyWiki and am now also getting into GTD. I spent half a day testing all the versions out there: Nozbe, Vitalist, Tracks, RememberTheMilk-with-GTD, only to end up with your "TiddlyWiki-with-GTD". Keep up the great work!

3:16 AM PST  
Blogger simon said...

Thanks Aldo. I may quote you on the new web site... :)

3:49 PM PST  
Anonymous Doug Cuthbertson said...

I started using mgtd-alpha just over two weeks ago. It is absolutely wonderful!

One thing you might consider is the DatePlugin and DatePluginConfig over at http://tiddlytools.com. They make the calendar come alive. Just click on a date and a list of all changes on that date drops down.

3:08 AM PDT  
Blogger Funk Wunky said...

You mention that reminders aren't GTD-like - okay, but *needing to be reminded* - perhaps that something has a deadline, and it's coming up, or when to follow up on something you're waiting for - seems perfectly 'GTD', at least IMO.

Some things/actions are only relevant for a window of time. That should be captureable, and this should show up when needed. A tickler is a separate concept, and i feel uncomfortable, for instance, reclassing an action as a tickler just to get a date on it.

The ReminderMacros are perhaps a bit too heavyweight, but you should check out how d3 integrates reminded actions.

In d3 any action can have one or more reminders associated with it - reminders aren't themselves tiddlers. Then, the review pane presents actions that have reminders and how soon they are coming up.

Just adding a "date" option to actions and doing some integration with the dashboard and project panes would be a lighter weight solution that I suspect would meet a substantial need. (at least mine ;)

Thank you so much for all of your work!

12:24 PM PDT  
Blogger Mike said...

Hi Simon,

I'm still trying to get myself oriented.

GTD aside, it seems as if there are a number of things needed to get work done -- with respect to this whole tickler/reminder area.

Suspense: Something which is in limbo until "something" happens. This is a traditional time managemnt term. It is something not connected to a date ... it is just waiting. In its traditional use, you would review the suspense file peridocally to check if somthing needs to be handled. It might also be triggered if someone did something to cause you to open that file.

Waiting For: I had not heard this term before GTD but in that context it seems to mean a suspense item which will be triggered by someone else's action. IOW, you delegated an item and are waiting for action to be done and be notified so that you can take YOUR next action.

Reminder/Tickler: I'm not sure I see the distinction. The main idea for these two is that you look at the items when some time has arrived or elapsed. I make this stand in for a suspense item by giving the item an arbitrary date. (I've ordered books from Amazon and gave the reminder one week and then I'll look at the tracking web site to see if theay are still on the way.)

What I would like to see is one tidler which had the actions of all three of these ideas. IOW, you could have items with the following attributes:

- A date or,
- No date.
- Linked to a person and,
- Linked to an action and,
- Linked to a project/sub project.
- Shows in a static list by date (those with no dates at the bottom, perhaps)
- Shows in projects and actions as a reference
- Has an "altert after days/date" feature where it flashes, has color, or simply appears in a reserved spot for alerts (or pops up an alert window or something.

Does that about cover all bases? ;-) I have no problem with multiple tiddler types with different behaviors, if that is necessary for technical simplicity, but it seems as though if you could make it a single tiddler that covers it all, life would be simpler.

One thing I notice with the latest release is that if you put in a tickler with no date it kind of messes up the list so one has to put in a dummy date to work around the problem.

I hope I am not simply rehashing old discussions.

Thanks again for a wonderful bit of code. It works so well!!!!

4:10 PM PDT  

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